1. 24 Jul, 2008 2 commits
  2. 08 May, 2007 1 commit
  3. 07 Dec, 2006 1 commit
    • Chen, Kenneth W's avatar
      [PATCH] shared page table for hugetlb page · 39dde65c
      Chen, Kenneth W authored
      
      
      Following up with the work on shared page table done by Dave McCracken.  This
      set of patch target shared page table for hugetlb memory only.
      
      The shared page table is particular useful in the situation of large number of
      independent processes sharing large shared memory segments.  In the normal
      page case, the amount of memory saved from process' page table is quite
      significant.  For hugetlb, the saving on page table memory is not the primary
      objective (as hugetlb itself already cuts down page table overhead
      significantly), instead, the purpose of using shared page table on hugetlb is
      to allow faster TLB refill and smaller cache pollution upon TLB miss.
      
      With PT sharing, pte entries are shared among hundreds of processes, the cache
      consumption used by all the page table is smaller and in return, application
      gets much higher cache hit ratio.  One other effect is that cache hit ratio
      with hardware page walker hitting on pte in cache will be higher and this
      helps to reduce tlb miss latency.  These two effects contribute to higher
      application performance.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarKen Chen <kenneth.w.chen@intel.com>
      Acked-by: default avatarHugh Dickins <hugh@veritas.com>
      Cc: Dave McCracken <dmccr@us.ibm.com>
      Cc: William Lee Irwin III <wli@holomorphy.com>
      Cc: "Luck, Tony" <tony.luck@intel.com>
      Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
      Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
      Cc: David Gibson <david@gibson.dropbear.id.au>
      Cc: Adam Litke <agl@us.ibm.com>
      Cc: Paul Mundt <lethal@linux-sh.org>
      Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      39dde65c
  4. 27 Sep, 2006 1 commit
    • Paul Mundt's avatar
      sh: hugetlb updates. · 3f787fe2
      Paul Mundt authored
      
      
      For some of the larger sizes we permitted spanning pages
      across several PTEs, but this turned out to not be generally
      useful. This reverts the sh hugetlbpage interface to something
      more sensible using huge pages at single PTE granularity.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarPaul Mundt <lethal@linux-sh.org>
      3f787fe2
  5. 30 Jun, 2006 1 commit
  6. 22 Mar, 2006 1 commit
    • David Gibson's avatar
      [PATCH] hugepage: is_aligned_hugepage_range() cleanup · 42b88bef
      David Gibson authored
      
      
      Quite a long time back, prepare_hugepage_range() replaced
      is_aligned_hugepage_range() as the callback from mm/mmap.c to arch code to
      verify if an address range is suitable for a hugepage mapping.
      is_aligned_hugepage_range() stuck around, but only to implement
      prepare_hugepage_range() on archs which didn't implement their own.
      
      Most archs (everything except ia64 and powerpc) used the same
      implementation of is_aligned_hugepage_range().  On powerpc, which
      implements its own prepare_hugepage_range(), the custom version was never
      used.
      
      In addition, "is_aligned_hugepage_range()" was a bad name, because it
      suggests it returns true iff the given range is a good hugepage range,
      whereas in fact it returns 0-or-error (so the sense is reversed).
      
      This patch cleans up by abolishing is_aligned_hugepage_range().  Instead
      prepare_hugepage_range() is defined directly.  Most archs use the default
      version, which simply checks the given region is aligned to the size of a
      hugepage.  ia64 and powerpc define custom versions.  The ia64 one simply
      checks that the range is in the correct address space region in addition to
      being suitably aligned.  The powerpc version (just as previously) checks
      for suitable addresses, and if necessary performs low-level MMU frobbing to
      set up new areas for use by hugepages.
      
      No libhugetlbfs testsuite regressions on ppc64 (POWER5 LPAR).
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDavid Gibson <david@gibson.dropbear.id.au>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarZhang Yanmin <yanmin.zhang@intel.com>
      Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
      Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
      Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
      Cc: William Lee Irwin III <wli@holomorphy.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      42b88bef
  7. 30 Oct, 2005 1 commit
  8. 22 Jun, 2005 1 commit
    • David Gibson's avatar
      [PATCH] Hugepage consolidation · 63551ae0
      David Gibson authored
      
      
      A lot of the code in arch/*/mm/hugetlbpage.c is quite similar.  This patch
      attempts to consolidate a lot of the code across the arch's, putting the
      combined version in mm/hugetlb.c.  There are a couple of uglyish hacks in
      order to covert all the hugepage archs, but the result is a very large
      reduction in the total amount of code.  It also means things like hugepage
      lazy allocation could be implemented in one place, instead of six.
      
      Tested, at least a little, on ppc64, i386 and x86_64.
      
      Notes:
      	- this patch changes the meaning of set_huge_pte() to be more
      	  analagous to set_pte()
      	- does SH4 need s special huge_ptep_get_and_clear()??
      Acked-by: default avatarWilliam Lee Irwin <wli@holomorphy.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      63551ae0
  9. 16 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • Linus Torvalds's avatar
      Linux-2.6.12-rc2 · 1da177e4
      Linus Torvalds authored
      Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history,
      even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git
      archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about
      3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early
      git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good
      infrastructure for it.
      
      Let it rip!
      1da177e4